archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders shares the extraordinarily small and intricate creations of Satoshi Araki, an artist based in Tokyo who painstakingly crafts miniature dioramas of towns, vehicles, and particularly cityscapes altered by urban decay and warfare. The level of realism and detail that Araki achieves on a 1/35 scale is astonishing.

"On his blog he explains that his primary tool for visual reference is google image search. Keywords like “Iraq war” and “Iraq ruins” (he warns that these search terms can also turn up some gruesome images) help him create scenes that are immensely life-like, even down to the smallest of details…”

But wait, these complex miniature scenes become even more impressive when you learn that Araki’s primary medium is Styrofoam board, cut down (way, way down) to the desired size and shape and then painted with tremendous care and attention to detail. For a diorama depicting a bombed-out corner in Baghdad, Araki made tiny beer and soda cans with labels written in Arabic. The last step is to glue everything together.
Follow Satoshi Araki’s blog or Twitter feed to check out more of his amazing creations.
[via Spoon & Tamago and RocketNews24]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders shares the extraordinarily small and intricate creations of Satoshi Araki, an artist based in Tokyo who painstakingly crafts miniature dioramas of towns, vehicles, and particularly cityscapes altered by urban decay and warfare. The level of realism and detail that Araki achieves on a 1/35 scale is astonishing.

"On his blog he explains that his primary tool for visual reference is google image search. Keywords like “Iraq war” and “Iraq ruins” (he warns that these search terms can also turn up some gruesome images) help him create scenes that are immensely life-like, even down to the smallest of details…”

But wait, these complex miniature scenes become even more impressive when you learn that Araki’s primary medium is Styrofoam board, cut down (way, way down) to the desired size and shape and then painted with tremendous care and attention to detail. For a diorama depicting a bombed-out corner in Baghdad, Araki made tiny beer and soda cans with labels written in Arabic. The last step is to glue everything together.
Follow Satoshi Araki’s blog or Twitter feed to check out more of his amazing creations.
[via Spoon & Tamago and RocketNews24]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders shares the extraordinarily small and intricate creations of Satoshi Araki, an artist based in Tokyo who painstakingly crafts miniature dioramas of towns, vehicles, and particularly cityscapes altered by urban decay and warfare. The level of realism and detail that Araki achieves on a 1/35 scale is astonishing.

"On his blog he explains that his primary tool for visual reference is google image search. Keywords like “Iraq war” and “Iraq ruins” (he warns that these search terms can also turn up some gruesome images) help him create scenes that are immensely life-like, even down to the smallest of details…”

But wait, these complex miniature scenes become even more impressive when you learn that Araki’s primary medium is Styrofoam board, cut down (way, way down) to the desired size and shape and then painted with tremendous care and attention to detail. For a diorama depicting a bombed-out corner in Baghdad, Araki made tiny beer and soda cans with labels written in Arabic. The last step is to glue everything together.
Follow Satoshi Araki’s blog or Twitter feed to check out more of his amazing creations.
[via Spoon & Tamago and RocketNews24]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders shares the extraordinarily small and intricate creations of Satoshi Araki, an artist based in Tokyo who painstakingly crafts miniature dioramas of towns, vehicles, and particularly cityscapes altered by urban decay and warfare. The level of realism and detail that Araki achieves on a 1/35 scale is astonishing.

"On his blog he explains that his primary tool for visual reference is google image search. Keywords like “Iraq war” and “Iraq ruins” (he warns that these search terms can also turn up some gruesome images) help him create scenes that are immensely life-like, even down to the smallest of details…”

But wait, these complex miniature scenes become even more impressive when you learn that Araki’s primary medium is Styrofoam board, cut down (way, way down) to the desired size and shape and then painted with tremendous care and attention to detail. For a diorama depicting a bombed-out corner in Baghdad, Araki made tiny beer and soda cans with labels written in Arabic. The last step is to glue everything together.
Follow Satoshi Araki’s blog or Twitter feed to check out more of his amazing creations.
[via Spoon & Tamago and RocketNews24]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders shares the extraordinarily small and intricate creations of Satoshi Araki, an artist based in Tokyo who painstakingly crafts miniature dioramas of towns, vehicles, and particularly cityscapes altered by urban decay and warfare. The level of realism and detail that Araki achieves on a 1/35 scale is astonishing.

"On his blog he explains that his primary tool for visual reference is google image search. Keywords like “Iraq war” and “Iraq ruins” (he warns that these search terms can also turn up some gruesome images) help him create scenes that are immensely life-like, even down to the smallest of details…”

But wait, these complex miniature scenes become even more impressive when you learn that Araki’s primary medium is Styrofoam board, cut down (way, way down) to the desired size and shape and then painted with tremendous care and attention to detail. For a diorama depicting a bombed-out corner in Baghdad, Araki made tiny beer and soda cans with labels written in Arabic. The last step is to glue everything together.
Follow Satoshi Araki’s blog or Twitter feed to check out more of his amazing creations.
[via Spoon & Tamago and RocketNews24]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders shares the extraordinarily small and intricate creations of Satoshi Araki, an artist based in Tokyo who painstakingly crafts miniature dioramas of towns, vehicles, and particularly cityscapes altered by urban decay and warfare. The level of realism and detail that Araki achieves on a 1/35 scale is astonishing.

"On his blog he explains that his primary tool for visual reference is google image search. Keywords like “Iraq war” and “Iraq ruins” (he warns that these search terms can also turn up some gruesome images) help him create scenes that are immensely life-like, even down to the smallest of details…”

But wait, these complex miniature scenes become even more impressive when you learn that Araki’s primary medium is Styrofoam board, cut down (way, way down) to the desired size and shape and then painted with tremendous care and attention to detail. For a diorama depicting a bombed-out corner in Baghdad, Araki made tiny beer and soda cans with labels written in Arabic. The last step is to glue everything together.
Follow Satoshi Araki’s blog or Twitter feed to check out more of his amazing creations.
[via Spoon & Tamago and RocketNews24]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders shares the extraordinarily small and intricate creations of Satoshi Araki, an artist based in Tokyo who painstakingly crafts miniature dioramas of towns, vehicles, and particularly cityscapes altered by urban decay and warfare. The level of realism and detail that Araki achieves on a 1/35 scale is astonishing.

"On his blog he explains that his primary tool for visual reference is google image search. Keywords like “Iraq war” and “Iraq ruins” (he warns that these search terms can also turn up some gruesome images) help him create scenes that are immensely life-like, even down to the smallest of details…”

But wait, these complex miniature scenes become even more impressive when you learn that Araki’s primary medium is Styrofoam board, cut down (way, way down) to the desired size and shape and then painted with tremendous care and attention to detail. For a diorama depicting a bombed-out corner in Baghdad, Araki made tiny beer and soda cans with labels written in Arabic. The last step is to glue everything together.
Follow Satoshi Araki’s blog or Twitter feed to check out more of his amazing creations.
[via Spoon & Tamago and RocketNews24]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders shares the extraordinarily small and intricate creations of Satoshi Araki, an artist based in Tokyo who painstakingly crafts miniature dioramas of towns, vehicles, and particularly cityscapes altered by urban decay and warfare. The level of realism and detail that Araki achieves on a 1/35 scale is astonishing.

"On his blog he explains that his primary tool for visual reference is google image search. Keywords like “Iraq war” and “Iraq ruins” (he warns that these search terms can also turn up some gruesome images) help him create scenes that are immensely life-like, even down to the smallest of details…”

But wait, these complex miniature scenes become even more impressive when you learn that Araki’s primary medium is Styrofoam board, cut down (way, way down) to the desired size and shape and then painted with tremendous care and attention to detail. For a diorama depicting a bombed-out corner in Baghdad, Araki made tiny beer and soda cans with labels written in Arabic. The last step is to glue everything together.
Follow Satoshi Araki’s blog or Twitter feed to check out more of his amazing creations.
[via Spoon & Tamago and RocketNews24]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders shares the extraordinarily small and intricate creations of Satoshi Araki, an artist based in Tokyo who painstakingly crafts miniature dioramas of towns, vehicles, and particularly cityscapes altered by urban decay and warfare. The level of realism and detail that Araki achieves on a 1/35 scale is astonishing.

"On his blog he explains that his primary tool for visual reference is google image search. Keywords like “Iraq war” and “Iraq ruins” (he warns that these search terms can also turn up some gruesome images) help him create scenes that are immensely life-like, even down to the smallest of details…”

But wait, these complex miniature scenes become even more impressive when you learn that Araki’s primary medium is Styrofoam board, cut down (way, way down) to the desired size and shape and then painted with tremendous care and attention to detail. For a diorama depicting a bombed-out corner in Baghdad, Araki made tiny beer and soda cans with labels written in Arabic. The last step is to glue everything together.
Follow Satoshi Araki’s blog or Twitter feed to check out more of his amazing creations.
[via Spoon & Tamago and RocketNews24]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders shares the extraordinarily small and intricate creations of Satoshi Araki, an artist based in Tokyo who painstakingly crafts miniature dioramas of towns, vehicles, and particularly cityscapes altered by urban decay and warfare. The level of realism and detail that Araki achieves on a 1/35 scale is astonishing.

"On his blog he explains that his primary tool for visual reference is google image search. Keywords like “Iraq war” and “Iraq ruins” (he warns that these search terms can also turn up some gruesome images) help him create scenes that are immensely life-like, even down to the smallest of details…”

But wait, these complex miniature scenes become even more impressive when you learn that Araki’s primary medium is Styrofoam board, cut down (way, way down) to the desired size and shape and then painted with tremendous care and attention to detail. For a diorama depicting a bombed-out corner in Baghdad, Araki made tiny beer and soda cans with labels written in Arabic. The last step is to glue everything together.
Follow Satoshi Araki’s blog or Twitter feed to check out more of his amazing creations.
[via Spoon & Tamago and RocketNews24]
Zoom Info

archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders shares the extraordinarily small and intricate creations of Satoshi Araki, an artist based in Tokyo who painstakingly crafts miniature dioramas of towns, vehicles, and particularly cityscapes altered by urban decay and warfare. The level of realism and detail that Araki achieves on a 1/35 scale is astonishing.

"On his blog he explains that his primary tool for visual reference is google image search. Keywords like “Iraq war” and “Iraq ruins” (he warns that these search terms can also turn up some gruesome images) help him create scenes that are immensely life-like, even down to the smallest of details…”

But wait, these complex miniature scenes become even more impressive when you learn that Araki’s primary medium is Styrofoam board, cut down (way, way down) to the desired size and shape and then painted with tremendous care and attention to detail. For a diorama depicting a bombed-out corner in Baghdad, Araki made tiny beer and soda cans with labels written in Arabic. The last step is to glue everything together.

Follow Satoshi Araki’s blog or Twitter feed to check out more of his amazing creations.

[via Spoon & Tamago and RocketNews24]

dizzymaiden:

I found this on Pinterest but it had one of those weird links to nowhere…so please forgive for no link. If this belongs to you, let me know!
This is my best interpretation of this DIY>
1. Draw petal like outline on filter
2. Cut out and layer into rose
3. Dip into food coloring or any dye…dry
Zoom Info
dizzymaiden:

I found this on Pinterest but it had one of those weird links to nowhere…so please forgive for no link. If this belongs to you, let me know!
This is my best interpretation of this DIY>
1. Draw petal like outline on filter
2. Cut out and layer into rose
3. Dip into food coloring or any dye…dry
Zoom Info
dizzymaiden:

I found this on Pinterest but it had one of those weird links to nowhere…so please forgive for no link. If this belongs to you, let me know!
This is my best interpretation of this DIY>
1. Draw petal like outline on filter
2. Cut out and layer into rose
3. Dip into food coloring or any dye…dry
Zoom Info
dizzymaiden:

I found this on Pinterest but it had one of those weird links to nowhere…so please forgive for no link. If this belongs to you, let me know!
This is my best interpretation of this DIY>
1. Draw petal like outline on filter
2. Cut out and layer into rose
3. Dip into food coloring or any dye…dry
Zoom Info

dizzymaiden:

I found this on Pinterest but it had one of those weird links to nowhere…so please forgive for no link. If this belongs to you, let me know!

This is my best interpretation of this DIY>

1. Draw petal like outline on filter

2. Cut out and layer into rose

3. Dip into food coloring or any dye…dry